envlanco
Cosas que me gustan y me sirven de inspiración.
envlanco
+
DSC_0143 on Flickr.
+
DSC_0147 on Flickr.
+
+
+
themadmod:

lelaid:

Divine by Antonio Lopez, New York, 1978

my queen <333
+
+
likeafieldmouse:

Pablo Rasgado - Unfolded Architecture (Museum Walls) (2011)
+
+
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aliki Komps
Melancholic Refuse
“Within the iconography and context of psychology, the standard chair is symbolic of comfort." In the domestic space, a chair typically symbolises rest, sitting down and taking a break. In an unclear, yet final movement, these chairs have been displaced from their domestic environment. They no longer function as a place of rest. Despite this though, an imprint of the lived body of the owner is undeniably visible on the surface and embedded within the very essence of the chair. Discarded, the chairs appear to be melancholic. As if their crookedness, shortcomings and incompleteness has eventuated in abandonment and exposure to the elements. But it is in the public space, that the chairs begin to breathe to a different rhythm.  (artist statement)

Tumblr
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aliki Komps
Melancholic Refuse
“Within the iconography and context of psychology, the standard chair is symbolic of comfort." In the domestic space, a chair typically symbolises rest, sitting down and taking a break. In an unclear, yet final movement, these chairs have been displaced from their domestic environment. They no longer function as a place of rest. Despite this though, an imprint of the lived body of the owner is undeniably visible on the surface and embedded within the very essence of the chair. Discarded, the chairs appear to be melancholic. As if their crookedness, shortcomings and incompleteness has eventuated in abandonment and exposure to the elements. But it is in the public space, that the chairs begin to breathe to a different rhythm.  (artist statement)

Tumblr
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aliki Komps
Melancholic Refuse
“Within the iconography and context of psychology, the standard chair is symbolic of comfort." In the domestic space, a chair typically symbolises rest, sitting down and taking a break. In an unclear, yet final movement, these chairs have been displaced from their domestic environment. They no longer function as a place of rest. Despite this though, an imprint of the lived body of the owner is undeniably visible on the surface and embedded within the very essence of the chair. Discarded, the chairs appear to be melancholic. As if their crookedness, shortcomings and incompleteness has eventuated in abandonment and exposure to the elements. But it is in the public space, that the chairs begin to breathe to a different rhythm.  (artist statement)

Tumblr
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aliki Komps
Melancholic Refuse
“Within the iconography and context of psychology, the standard chair is symbolic of comfort." In the domestic space, a chair typically symbolises rest, sitting down and taking a break. In an unclear, yet final movement, these chairs have been displaced from their domestic environment. They no longer function as a place of rest. Despite this though, an imprint of the lived body of the owner is undeniably visible on the surface and embedded within the very essence of the chair. Discarded, the chairs appear to be melancholic. As if their crookedness, shortcomings and incompleteness has eventuated in abandonment and exposure to the elements. But it is in the public space, that the chairs begin to breathe to a different rhythm.  (artist statement)

Tumblr
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aliki Komps
Melancholic Refuse
“Within the iconography and context of psychology, the standard chair is symbolic of comfort." In the domestic space, a chair typically symbolises rest, sitting down and taking a break. In an unclear, yet final movement, these chairs have been displaced from their domestic environment. They no longer function as a place of rest. Despite this though, an imprint of the lived body of the owner is undeniably visible on the surface and embedded within the very essence of the chair. Discarded, the chairs appear to be melancholic. As if their crookedness, shortcomings and incompleteness has eventuated in abandonment and exposure to the elements. But it is in the public space, that the chairs begin to breathe to a different rhythm.  (artist statement)

Tumblr
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aliki Komps
Melancholic Refuse
“Within the iconography and context of psychology, the standard chair is symbolic of comfort." In the domestic space, a chair typically symbolises rest, sitting down and taking a break. In an unclear, yet final movement, these chairs have been displaced from their domestic environment. They no longer function as a place of rest. Despite this though, an imprint of the lived body of the owner is undeniably visible on the surface and embedded within the very essence of the chair. Discarded, the chairs appear to be melancholic. As if their crookedness, shortcomings and incompleteness has eventuated in abandonment and exposure to the elements. But it is in the public space, that the chairs begin to breathe to a different rhythm.  (artist statement)

Tumblr
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aliki Komps
Melancholic Refuse
“Within the iconography and context of psychology, the standard chair is symbolic of comfort." In the domestic space, a chair typically symbolises rest, sitting down and taking a break. In an unclear, yet final movement, these chairs have been displaced from their domestic environment. They no longer function as a place of rest. Despite this though, an imprint of the lived body of the owner is undeniably visible on the surface and embedded within the very essence of the chair. Discarded, the chairs appear to be melancholic. As if their crookedness, shortcomings and incompleteness has eventuated in abandonment and exposure to the elements. But it is in the public space, that the chairs begin to breathe to a different rhythm.  (artist statement)

Tumblr
+
+
+
+
design-is-fine:

Peter Dixon, in-house design for Sainsbury’s packaging, 1960s-70s. England. Cola 1966, Biscuits 1967, Crackers 1968, Peas 1970, Cornflakes 1976, Milk 1978. Via creativereview
design-is-fine:

Peter Dixon, in-house design for Sainsbury’s packaging, 1960s-70s. England. Cola 1966, Biscuits 1967, Crackers 1968, Peas 1970, Cornflakes 1976, Milk 1978. Via creativereview
design-is-fine:

Peter Dixon, in-house design for Sainsbury’s packaging, 1960s-70s. England. Cola 1966, Biscuits 1967, Crackers 1968, Peas 1970, Cornflakes 1976, Milk 1978. Via creativereview
design-is-fine:

Peter Dixon, in-house design for Sainsbury’s packaging, 1960s-70s. England. Cola 1966, Biscuits 1967, Crackers 1968, Peas 1970, Cornflakes 1976, Milk 1978. Via creativereview
design-is-fine:

Peter Dixon, in-house design for Sainsbury’s packaging, 1960s-70s. England. Cola 1966, Biscuits 1967, Crackers 1968, Peas 1970, Cornflakes 1976, Milk 1978. Via creativereview
design-is-fine:

Peter Dixon, in-house design for Sainsbury’s packaging, 1960s-70s. England. Cola 1966, Biscuits 1967, Crackers 1968, Peas 1970, Cornflakes 1976, Milk 1978. Via creativereview
+
runswith:

Nightlight
Madrid, Spain - 7/15/10
+
cross-connect:

Adam Simpson, English illustrator.
This is “Boundary Hotel Elevator”. A commission to produce an artwork to appear floor to ceiling, all 4 sides of the elevator vestibule at the new ‘Boundary Hotel’ situated on Boundary Street in London. The artwork was devised around a grid of boundary walls. Each walled segment is about 170mm square. The idea behind producing such a detailed artwork was that each journey in the elevator would give the visitor a chance to study a new scene in the artwork. A geometric toile de jouy of sorts. The conversion of the Victorian warehouse building on Boundary Street, into a boutique hotel, was a joint venture between Sir Terence Conran, Lady Conran and Peter Prescott & Partners. The hotel opened in January 2009. 
(Text from ADC Young Guns).
cross-connect:

Adam Simpson, English illustrator.
This is “Boundary Hotel Elevator”. A commission to produce an artwork to appear floor to ceiling, all 4 sides of the elevator vestibule at the new ‘Boundary Hotel’ situated on Boundary Street in London. The artwork was devised around a grid of boundary walls. Each walled segment is about 170mm square. The idea behind producing such a detailed artwork was that each journey in the elevator would give the visitor a chance to study a new scene in the artwork. A geometric toile de jouy of sorts. The conversion of the Victorian warehouse building on Boundary Street, into a boutique hotel, was a joint venture between Sir Terence Conran, Lady Conran and Peter Prescott & Partners. The hotel opened in January 2009. 
(Text from ADC Young Guns).
cross-connect:

Adam Simpson, English illustrator.
This is “Boundary Hotel Elevator”. A commission to produce an artwork to appear floor to ceiling, all 4 sides of the elevator vestibule at the new ‘Boundary Hotel’ situated on Boundary Street in London. The artwork was devised around a grid of boundary walls. Each walled segment is about 170mm square. The idea behind producing such a detailed artwork was that each journey in the elevator would give the visitor a chance to study a new scene in the artwork. A geometric toile de jouy of sorts. The conversion of the Victorian warehouse building on Boundary Street, into a boutique hotel, was a joint venture between Sir Terence Conran, Lady Conran and Peter Prescott & Partners. The hotel opened in January 2009. 
(Text from ADC Young Guns).
cross-connect:

Adam Simpson, English illustrator.
This is “Boundary Hotel Elevator”. A commission to produce an artwork to appear floor to ceiling, all 4 sides of the elevator vestibule at the new ‘Boundary Hotel’ situated on Boundary Street in London. The artwork was devised around a grid of boundary walls. Each walled segment is about 170mm square. The idea behind producing such a detailed artwork was that each journey in the elevator would give the visitor a chance to study a new scene in the artwork. A geometric toile de jouy of sorts. The conversion of the Victorian warehouse building on Boundary Street, into a boutique hotel, was a joint venture between Sir Terence Conran, Lady Conran and Peter Prescott & Partners. The hotel opened in January 2009. 
(Text from ADC Young Guns).
cross-connect:

Adam Simpson, English illustrator.
This is “Boundary Hotel Elevator”. A commission to produce an artwork to appear floor to ceiling, all 4 sides of the elevator vestibule at the new ‘Boundary Hotel’ situated on Boundary Street in London. The artwork was devised around a grid of boundary walls. Each walled segment is about 170mm square. The idea behind producing such a detailed artwork was that each journey in the elevator would give the visitor a chance to study a new scene in the artwork. A geometric toile de jouy of sorts. The conversion of the Victorian warehouse building on Boundary Street, into a boutique hotel, was a joint venture between Sir Terence Conran, Lady Conran and Peter Prescott & Partners. The hotel opened in January 2009. 
(Text from ADC Young Guns).
cross-connect:

Adam Simpson, English illustrator.
This is “Boundary Hotel Elevator”. A commission to produce an artwork to appear floor to ceiling, all 4 sides of the elevator vestibule at the new ‘Boundary Hotel’ situated on Boundary Street in London. The artwork was devised around a grid of boundary walls. Each walled segment is about 170mm square. The idea behind producing such a detailed artwork was that each journey in the elevator would give the visitor a chance to study a new scene in the artwork. A geometric toile de jouy of sorts. The conversion of the Victorian warehouse building on Boundary Street, into a boutique hotel, was a joint venture between Sir Terence Conran, Lady Conran and Peter Prescott & Partners. The hotel opened in January 2009. 
(Text from ADC Young Guns).
cross-connect:

Adam Simpson, English illustrator.
This is “Boundary Hotel Elevator”. A commission to produce an artwork to appear floor to ceiling, all 4 sides of the elevator vestibule at the new ‘Boundary Hotel’ situated on Boundary Street in London. The artwork was devised around a grid of boundary walls. Each walled segment is about 170mm square. The idea behind producing such a detailed artwork was that each journey in the elevator would give the visitor a chance to study a new scene in the artwork. A geometric toile de jouy of sorts. The conversion of the Victorian warehouse building on Boundary Street, into a boutique hotel, was a joint venture between Sir Terence Conran, Lady Conran and Peter Prescott & Partners. The hotel opened in January 2009. 
(Text from ADC Young Guns).
cross-connect:

Adam Simpson, English illustrator.
This is “Boundary Hotel Elevator”. A commission to produce an artwork to appear floor to ceiling, all 4 sides of the elevator vestibule at the new ‘Boundary Hotel’ situated on Boundary Street in London. The artwork was devised around a grid of boundary walls. Each walled segment is about 170mm square. The idea behind producing such a detailed artwork was that each journey in the elevator would give the visitor a chance to study a new scene in the artwork. A geometric toile de jouy of sorts. The conversion of the Victorian warehouse building on Boundary Street, into a boutique hotel, was a joint venture between Sir Terence Conran, Lady Conran and Peter Prescott & Partners. The hotel opened in January 2009. 
(Text from ADC Young Guns).
cross-connect:

Adam Simpson, English illustrator.
This is “Boundary Hotel Elevator”. A commission to produce an artwork to appear floor to ceiling, all 4 sides of the elevator vestibule at the new ‘Boundary Hotel’ situated on Boundary Street in London. The artwork was devised around a grid of boundary walls. Each walled segment is about 170mm square. The idea behind producing such a detailed artwork was that each journey in the elevator would give the visitor a chance to study a new scene in the artwork. A geometric toile de jouy of sorts. The conversion of the Victorian warehouse building on Boundary Street, into a boutique hotel, was a joint venture between Sir Terence Conran, Lady Conran and Peter Prescott & Partners. The hotel opened in January 2009. 
(Text from ADC Young Guns).
cross-connect:

Adam Simpson, English illustrator.
This is “Boundary Hotel Elevator”. A commission to produce an artwork to appear floor to ceiling, all 4 sides of the elevator vestibule at the new ‘Boundary Hotel’ situated on Boundary Street in London. The artwork was devised around a grid of boundary walls. Each walled segment is about 170mm square. The idea behind producing such a detailed artwork was that each journey in the elevator would give the visitor a chance to study a new scene in the artwork. A geometric toile de jouy of sorts. The conversion of the Victorian warehouse building on Boundary Street, into a boutique hotel, was a joint venture between Sir Terence Conran, Lady Conran and Peter Prescott & Partners. The hotel opened in January 2009. 
(Text from ADC Young Guns).